Monthly Archives: July 2015

Impala JDBC connection

http://www.cloudera.com/content/cloudera/en/documentation/cloudera-impala/latest/topics/impala_jdbc.html

Establishing JDBC Connections

The JDBC driver class is org.apache.hive.jdbc.HiveDriver. Once you have configured Impala to work with JDBC, you can establish connections between the two. To do so for a cluster that does not use Kerberos authentication, use a connection string of the form jdbc:hive2://host:port/;auth=noSasl. For example, you might use:

jdbc:hive2://myhost.example.com:21050/;auth=noSasl

To connect to an instance of Impala that requires Kerberos authentication, use a connection string of the form jdbc:hive2://host:port/;principal=principal_name. The principal must be the same user principal you used when starting Impala. For example, you might use:

jdbc:hive2://myhost.example.com:21050/;principal=impala/myhost.example.com@H2.EXAMPLE.COM

To connect to an instance of Impala that requires LDAP authentication, use a connection string of the form jdbc:hive2://host:port/db_name;user=ldap_userid;password=ldap_password. For example, you might use:

jdbc:hive2://myhost.example.com:21050/test_db;user=fred;password=xyz123
  Note: If your JDBC or ODBC application connects to Impala through a load balancer such as haproxy, be cautious about reusing the connections. If the load balancer has set up connection timeout values, either check the connection frequently so that it never sits idle longer than the load balancer timeout value, or check the connection validity before using it and create a new one if the connection has been closed.